THE RISE OF LE CORBUSIER- VILLA SAVOYE

•January 27, 2010 • Leave a Comment

I already mentioned that Le Corbusier laid down theoretical principles in his Five Points of 1926.
The Villa Savoy is also based on a grid of regularly-spaced columns, which gives coherence to a rich and varied juxtapositions of curved and straight planes and enveloping membranes. The levels are interconnected by means of a centrally place ramp, which makes experiencing the house a promenade architectural. The house possesses an unsurpassed spatial complexity and richness.
Le Corbusier is framing the landscape from different levels and from different points of view. He uses his imagination and gives the dweller the experience of the different dimension. He uses optical tricks to surprise.
On the approach is visible symmetrical building with classical arrangement already mentioned that Le Corbusier laid down theoretical principles in his Five Points of 1926.
The Villa Savoy is also based on a grid of regularly-spaced columns, which gives coherence to a rich and varied juxtapositions of curved and straight planes and enveloping membranes. The levels are interconnected by means of a centrally place ramp, which makes experiencing the house a promenade architectural. The house possesses an unsurpassed spatial complexity and richness.


Plan of Villa Savoye

Le Corbusier is framing the landscape from different levels and from different points of view. He uses his imagination and gives the dweller the experience of the different dimension. He uses optical tricks to surprise.
On the approach is visible symmetrical building with classical arrangement.
Classical style characterises with symmetry. This was a style of Greeks and Romans. On Platform 1 we did survey 33 Portland Place which was designed by Robert Adam. It’s important to add that for Adam the symmetry was greatly important.

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BAUHAUSA

•January 27, 2010 • Leave a Comment


The Bauhaus

Bauhaus School was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar. The Bauhaus style bacame one of the most influential currents in Modernist architecture and modern design. The Bauhaus had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art , architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design.
The Bauhaus had a major impact on art and architecture trends in Western Europe, the United States, Canada and Israel (particularly in White City, Tel Aviv) in the decades following its demise, as many of the artists involved fled, or were exiled, by the Nazi regime. Tel Aviv, in fact, has been named to the list of world heritage sites by the UN due to its abundance of Bauhaus architecture in 2004; it had some 4000 Bauhaus buildings erected from 1933 on.

Walter Gropius, Marcel Breuer, and László Moholy-Nagy re-assembled in Britain during the mid 1930s to live and work in the Isokon project before the war caught up with them. Both Gropius and Breuer went to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and worked together before their professional split. The Harvard School was enormously influential in America in the late 1920s and early 1930s, producing such students as Philip Johnson, I.M. Pei, Lawrence Halprin and Paul Rudolph, among many others.

In the late 1930s, Mies van der Rohe re-settled in Chicago, enjoyed the sponsorship of the influential Philip Johnson, and became one of the pre-eminent architects in the world. Moholy-Nagy also went to Chicago and founded the New Bauhaus school under the sponsorship of industrialist and philanthropist Walter Paepcke. This school became the Institute of Design, part of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Printmaker and painter Werner Drewes was also largely responsible for bringing the Bauhaus aesthetic to America and taught at both Columbia University and Washington University in St. Louis. Herbert Bayer, sponsored by Paepcke, moved to Aspen, Colorado in support of Paepcke’s Aspen projects at the Aspen Institute. In 1953, Max Bill, together with Inge Aicher-Scholl and Otl Aicher, founded the Ulm School of Design (German: Hochschule für Gestaltung – HfG Ulm) in Ulm, Germany, a design school in the tradition of the Bauhaus. The school is notable for its inclusion of semiotics as a field of study. The school closed in 1968, but the ′Ulm Model′ concept continues to influence international design education.

One of the main objectives of the Bauhaus was to unify art, craft, and technology. The machine was considered a positive element, and therefore industrial and product design were important components. Vorkurs (“initial” or “preliminary course”) was taught; this is the modern day “Basic Design” course that has become one of the key foundational courses offered in architectural and design schools across the globe. There was no teaching of history in the school because everything was supposed to be designed and created according to first principles rather than by following precedent.

One of the most important contributions of the Bauhaus is in the field of modern furniture design. The ubiquitous Cantilever chair by Dutch designer Mart Stam, using the tensile properties of steel, and the Wassily Chair designed by Marcel Breuer are two examples.

The physical plant at Dessau survived World War II and was operated as a design school with some architectural facilities by the German Democratic Republic. This included live stage productions in the Bauhaus theater under the name of Bauhausbühne (“Bauhaus Stage”). After German reunification, a reorganized school continued in the same building, with no essential continuity with the Bauhaus under Gropius in the early 1920s. In 1979 Bauhaus-Dessau College started to organize postgraduate programs with participants from all over the world. This effort has been supported by the Bauhaus-Dessau Foundation which was founded in 1974 as a public institution.